Since Citizens Expect the Worst, Things Will Get Worse

According to Gallup, "The index is a summary of whether Americans are satisfied with their current standard of living and perceive it as getting better or worse. Although the index has a theoretical maximum of 100 (and a theoretical minimum of -100), the highest it has been since tracking began in 2008 is 45, attained in May 2013."

According to Gallup, “The index is a summary of whether Americans are satisfied with their current standard of living and perceive it as getting better or worse. Although the index has a theoretical maximum of 100 (and a theoretical minimum of -100), the highest it has been since tracking began in 2008 is 45, attained in May 2013.”

Gallup’s Standard of Living Index is at the low for this year.

Last time we recorded this data was when we were being frightened by the spin using the “fiscal cliff” terminology — as if we weren’t spending BILLIONS blowing people off the face of the earth and ignoring our problems here.

Gallup‘s Standard of Living Index now matches the low for this year, last recorded in early January, shortly after the Congress passed an 11th-hour budget agreement that avoided sending the federal government over a so-called “fiscal cliff.”

Or as if we didn’t know that there are kings and queens sitting pretty …

… drenched in wealth …

… at the very top making up less than 1% of our population while
the “other 99%” struggle
at various levels of comfort (and discomfort)
straight down

[gay-ly down]

down to
homelessness
and
poverty.

But Wait!
That’s not all!!!

Not only is the U.S. standard of living low, it’s expected to go down.

That kind of drama has been replayed in the past month with similar effects on Americans’ confidence in the economy and their standard of living[,]

continues Gallup,

The good news is that, while the current Standard of Living Index — at 31 — is down from the heights it reached earlier this year, it remains higher than the lowest readings in each of the previous five years. This indicates that, while the bottom has not yet fallen out of Americans’ satisfaction with their standard of living, there is the capacity for it to fall even further.

down

     down

          down

And what we foresee … ,
what we envision … ,
what we expect … ,
what we consciously or subconsciously work toward

… well …

it tends to happen [period]

Confident in getting that job? You might just get it! Think you nailed that test? You probably did. I truly believe that we make our futures.

Done fighting your terminal illness? Too bad. You’ll likely die earlier. [FIGHT!]

“Hooray.” Come on, y’all. Buck up, folks.

Stop being your own block to success!

And if, as I say, you are a “grown ass” man or woman – then act like one. Get to work and make it happen. Seriously.

Look how it’s all related. It’s all related!

Gallup says, "Both components of the Standard of Living Index have soured since mid-September; however, the decline in Americans' outlook for their standard of living has been steeper, dropping nine points, compared with a six-point drop for current satisfaction. Longer term, since the start of August, Americans' net satisfaction with their standard of living has varied relatively little -- generally registering in a four-point range between 47 and 51, except for the one reading of 53 in mid-September. By contrast, net optimism about one's standard of living has registered in a 12-point range, from scores of 27 to 15."

Gallup says, “Both components of the Standard of Living Index have soured since mid-September; however, the decline in Americans’ outlook for their standard of living has been steeper, dropping nine points, compared with a six-point drop for current satisfaction.
Longer term, since the start of August, Americans’ net satisfaction with their standard of living has varied relatively little — generally registering in a four-point range between 47 and 51, except for the one reading of 53 in mid-September. By contrast, net optimism about one’s standard of living has registered in a 12-point range, from scores of 27 to 15.”

So, CHANGE IT.

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